Preparing Your Planters For Growth

 
Much as we wish they would, beautiful planter displays don’t happen overnight. There’s usually a lot of planning gone into them beforehand such as which flowers or plants would look best in particular locations, how much sunlight they’ll pick up and what type of soil they’ll fare best with etc.
Here we’ll take you through some preliminaries to make sure you get the best from your garden planters purchase at Precious Design.

 
• Soil
Regardless of the type of soil you plan on using for your planters, it’s always a good idea to invest in some slow-release fertiliser to mix in prior to planting. This should give the plants a good six months reprieve at least and

let you concentrate on other domestic matters while they just get on with enhancing your environment. Always leave a space of around three inches between the rim of your garden planters and the top of the soil. Once the soil is even pat it down but not too much so that it becomes compacted.
 
• Watering
To reduce the need for regular watering it’s possible to use water-holding gel (this is especially important if your soil happens to contain peat). The gel is purchased as crystals which swell once water is added and can then be blended in to the soil.
 
• Location
By the time you’ve put in stones to weigh down your galvanized steel planters and added soil, the large planters in particular can be extremely heavy to move around. In order to avoid strain on your back then it’s a good idea to leave filling the planters until they’re in their final resting position.
 
• Weather
A big consideration for the location of your planters is their exposure to sunlight and shade as well as other weather elements. Balancing them on a prop will also prevent the ground beneath them getting waterlogged. Galvanized steel planters tend to retain moisture which is good news for root development.
 
• Shape
The size and shape of your steel planters should benefit your plant, rather than the other way around. It’s fine to buy a cubed planter or even triangular versions etc but one that is too small could crowd the roots of your plant and cut off moisture and nutrients. On the other hand one that is too large can result in the roots getting smothered because the extra soil becomes waterlogged.

 
 

Remember too that the plant will grow so consider how it’s going to look in a year or two’s time to ensure it’ll remain in scale. Generally your planter should be two inches deeper and wider than the container you’ve purchased it in. If you’re putting in more than one plant then they should be up to eight inches apart (unlike in the ground where the gap should be up to 12 inches wide).
 
In conclusion, there’s certainly some considerations you have to make prior to purchasing metal or coloured planters, but on the whole it’s nothing compared to the delight this garden or home accessory will bring you and your family. For more ideas with garden planters and to check out our spring sale take a look at our selection here.
 

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